Moontrails and Doubt

moontrail There’s no doubt about it, writing is tough. But to get technical about it, it’s not so much the writing that’s so hard, but at times, finding the motivation and the perseverance to get through each project.

After many years, you no longer expect fanfare, nor an unexpected financial glut; however, it’s nice to have support, even if it’s an occasional pat on the back by family members. A kind word by people you expect to support you in life endeavors to say, “You can do it.”

Alas, that’s not the cards handed to many of us.

I had objections to the Kickstarter Project, because I knew after reading the list of winning traits of a project, I had a slim chance of meeting my goal. I’m not exactly a social butterfly. I don’t have a lot of followers, nor do I have the skills to create that winning video that so much attention is focused on.

My youngest daughter, Gloria urged me on. (She is one of my supporters). “Mom, you can at least try. Can’t get anywhere if you don’t try.”

So I did. It’s kind of like the idea of winning the lottery, right? You can’t win if you don’t play.

I have to say that throughout these past few weeks, I haven’t been too surprised to find friends and family members have become eerily silent. Especially, when asked to share a link to the project.

Despite this, a few high points. First, that people who don’t know me in real life, actually had enough faith in my work to become backers. [For those who did: Thank you, thank you, thank you. Even if the project is a complete (epic) failure, I appreciate this gesture more than you could ever know.]

Second, that I have learned a good deal about these types of projects. Primarily, that in crowdsourcing/funding you must have many followers and supporters who are willing to share your information with others.

There have been a couple of people who have helped with this. It may not seem like much to some, but to authors needing encouragement, sharing a link, or mentioning our work to anyone, is enough to keep us moving forward. Though we would appreciate the people we love to show a bit more faith in us, some of us understand their lack of enthusiasm in our struggles.

For those who don’t support family (or long-time friend) author/artist, I have written a poem for you.

 

Ode to the Doubters

Oh you, who have sat
on haunches,
twenty years, thirty
Nary a creative thought.

Looking through dirty glasses,
down noses, making judgments
How he should be,

what she should wear.
Brighten your day with
understanding.

Know his word,
her voice, or image
will move, 
into the future
long after you
are buried
gone
forgotten.

Photo credit: Moontrail by Emilio Robert Vicol

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